Author Archives: ewadmin

Repairing a Plastic Hatch with G/Flex

By Tom Pawlak

A local sailor stopped by our shop with an old plastic hatch that was slightly warped and badly cracked. He hadn’t been able to find a similar hatch to replace it. He wondered if we had an epoxy that could be used to repair the hatch. I said G/flex would likely work but to know for sure we needed to do a bit of adhesion testing. Continue reading

Norwegian Gunning Dory

By Paul Butler

This plywood/epoxy Norwegian Gunning Dory is drawn with inspiration from the classic lines of Scandinavian watercraft. The ply/epoxy hull is much simplified from traditional plank-on-frame versions. The lightweight version can weigh less than 60 lb (27 kg), making it an easy car-topper. Instead of the traditional V bottom, there is a flat panel on the hull bottom to simplify construction and provide extra stability.

Safety Features

Watertight fore and aft compartments provide additional hull support, dry storage and the safety of flotation spaces. Additional compartments are optional and open-water versions can be built self-bailing.

Capacity and Functionality

Loaded with gear for camp-cruising or with a passenger and gear, the boat becomes increasingly stable for general recreation, fishing, or drifting small streams and exploring waterways. The 15′ 9″ (4.8 m) length and 45″ (1.14. m) beam provide a stable platform. The Norwegian Gunning Dory can also be poled, or paddled like a canoe. There is room for two fixed-seat rowing stations or a single sliding seat; the lightweight hull is fast enough to make open water rowing with a sliding seat interesting.

Easy Care

Maintenance is much reduced with epoxy sealed plywood and the slick, hard graphite covered bottom allows dragging the hull over parking lots, launch ramps and gravel beaches.

The 30-page building plans are $46 and include photos, sketches, step-by-step directions and a discussion of many options to help the amateur builder customize the boat to suit usage. See additional photos with 2 interior layouts and details at www.butlerprojects.com.

 

Testing for Damage Tolerance

By Jeff Wright

Ted Moores and his company, Bear Mountain Boats, build wood epoxy strip plank canoes, manufacture kits and publish books on building strip plank canoes and kayaks. This method of construction provides a very light yet stiff structure and also enables the hull shape to have compound curves. Moores has 30 years of experience and his designs have logged many safe miles. He understands the forces boats are subjected to when paddled on the water and during transportation. Continue reading

Of Applecores and Deadeyes

By Bruce Niederer and Bill Bertelsen

Gougeon Brothers, Inc. has supported our local tallships—Appledore IV and Appledore V—since they arrived at their downtown Bay City facilities on the Saginaw River. These steel-hulled, gaff-rigged schooners are typical of the type that sailed the Great Lakes and coastal waters right up to the end of the age of sail. Schooners were the primary means of transporting goods and people over long distances. Continue reading

International Yacht Restoration School (IYRS)

By Cynthia Goss

If you travel to the campus of the International Yacht Restoration School, you might think you are walking into the past. The staff offices are inside a restored 1831 mill building. Students restore wooden boats from the 19th and 20th centuries while learning plank-on-frame construction inside a cavernous building from 1903. And hanging off the IYRS docks are majestic classics from a bygone era. Continue reading

Using G/5 as a Clear Filler for Dented Varnish Trim

By Tom Pawlak

A few years ago a customer approached me at one of the trade shows to say he loves our G/5 Five-Minute Adhesive for filling dents in wood trim prior to reapplying varnish. I thought what a great idea. It cures clear, can be wet sanded in an hour (longer if you are dry sanding) and can be varnished over without a problem. It looks much better than filling with wood putty because it is clear. It can be difficult matching the surrounding wood color when filling with wood putty.

I used his tip the last time I prepared my wood strip canoe for a fresh coat of varnish. It had Continue reading

Guitar Hero

Curt Wilson Loves Guitars.

And to many others who love guitars, especially classic old electric guitars, Curt Wilson is a hero. Curt combines his knowledge of epoxy and guitar anatomy with an acute attention to detail and the skills of a surgeon to bring back to life guitars that should have played their last note. Continue reading

Huialoha, a lobster boat

Readers’ Projects, Issue 31

Huialoha

We built Huialoha about eight years ago with no blueprints or plans. We started with several pictures of lobster boats from New England and did a Hawaiian version. He had 100 sheets of 3/8” (9.5 mm) marine plywood and about 50 gallons of WEST SYSTEM Epoxy. It took three months to do the hull and the boat in the water. The cabin was added while the boat was in the water. I am still working on the interior teak trim. Every time I go down to the harbor to work on it, I get distracted by Hawaii’s beautiful weather and end up going out for a cruise and swim instead! Continue reading

Reflecting on Sailing Days Past

by Captain James R. Watson

Epoxyworks 30

Cover Photo: One of LADY B’s first sails on the Saginaw River near the Gougeon Brothers boat shop.

Lady B is a sailing sharpie I launched on August 20, 2009. On one of the first sails, I asked Jan Gougeon to come along with me to see what he thought of her. That sail brought back many memorable sailing moments that Jan and I have shared over our lifetimes. Jan Gougeon grew up on Donahue Beach and I on nearby Aplin Beach. The two beaches were separated by Wenona Beach, a magnificent amusement park built at the turn of the century. We were in the same kindergarten class. It wasn’t long before we were both in boats we’d built: Jan in his 13′ Dart and I in my 8′ pram, the Pal. Back in those days we built using bedding compound and lots of screws. We carried coffee cans to bail our leaky boats. Around 1955, Continue reading

Project X Fairing Technique

By John M. Thomas

Almost 40 years ago Meade and Jan Gougeon opened their doors to a fastener-less method of boat construction using epoxy and various clamping methods. Jan’s newest boat is in the home stretch to completion, and he is addressing the fine tweaks of coaming and fairing. Continue reading