Category Archives: Wooden Boat Construction

One proud kid, as well he should be.

River Hornet

A MiniMax Hydroplane

By Jeffrey Carpenter
Epoxyworks 50 Cover

Cover Photo: Joshua and his Minimax Hydroplane

In late 2018, my son and I were given a unique opportunity by the Michigan-based Water Wonderland Chapter of the Antique and Classic Boat Society (ACBS) to build an 8′ MiniMax hydroplane based on original plans from the early 1960s. Almost anything from that era seems to be popular again. Maybe it’s nostalgia or maybe the designs of that groundbreaking decade were just ahead of their time. Either way, the MiniMax’s appeal seems as relevant today as it did in 1962. We accepted the challenge without hesitation. Continue reading

Workstar 17

Morning Sun

A Workstar 17

By Chris Smith

Small communities benefit when local groups work together to produce results greater than the sum of their individual efforts. Three organizations combined their efforts to create such synergy in a coastal county on Lake Huron. The Iosco County Family Court, local Elks Lodge 2525 and Heritage Coast Sailing and Rowing (HCS&R) combined efforts to develop a positive training program for youthful offenders and provide a staunch safety boat for the new not-for-profit sailing school. Continue reading

ITALMAS Revisited

In Epoxyworks 47 we featured an article on the construction of Italmas. Today she’s nearly complete, and true to reputation, Van Dam Custom Boatworks never disappoints. Here are a few photos of the boat showing off some of the craftsmanship Van Dam is famous for. Continue reading

The completed Jericho Skiff

Building a Jericho Bay Lobster Skiff

By Brian Donaldson

Over the past three winters, the boatbuilding crew of the Saginaw Bay Community Sailing Association (SBCSA) strip-built a Jericho Bay lobster skiff. They used the plans from WoodenBoat magazine, which master boatbuilder Tom Hill measured from a Joel White-designed boat. More than twenty people have worked on the skiff. Continue reading

Daniel's grandson taking his new car and boat with trailer for a spin.

Chris Craft Baby Runabout

by Daniel Laeyendecker

I designed this project by scaling down a Chris Craft runabout from pictures I found online.

Hull and Drive Assembly

I started with five rib frames and a center beam temporarily mounted upside-down on a workbench. I glued and stapled the ¼” x ¾” bead-and-cove pine strips to the ribs. Once all the strips were installed, I removed the staples and sanded the hull smooth for the heat-activated 2″ mahogany strips I’d apply later.

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Clam Girl, an adult sized pram

The Joy of Six10

For Teak Gunwales on Prototype Clam Girl

by Hugh Horton

Meade Gougeon was excited in 2008. “I’m using Six10 for everything!” he said. He was working on his sailing canoe in Florida. In every phone conversation we had, he seemed to find a new use for Six10, “… even for composite layups because of its ‘shear thinning’,” a phrase new to me.

In May of 2018, a perfect application came along for Six10—the teak gunwales capping the plywood endgrain on my prototype Clam Girl.

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WOW 17 Years Later

WOW 17 Years Later

By Mark Bronkalla

WOW, the home-built runabout I completed in 2000, has been a focal point of summer activities for our family and friends over the years. We’ve spent hundreds of happy hours out on the water, and taken it on vacations to northern Wisconsin, Kentucky, and New York. The majority of WOW’s use has been in Lake Nagawicka in Southeast Wisconsin.

WOW is a 20′ Glen-L Riviera with an inboard 350 cubic inch V8 engine. The hull is constructed of white ash frames, okoume plywood inner laminations, and a Honduras mahogany outer layer. The exterior is sheathed with 4 oz. fiberglass cloth on the deck, and 6 oz. on the sides and bottom. Primary construction was over one winter (see WOW by Mike Barnard in Epoxyworks 43). We started the build at the end of August 1999 and launched at the end of June 2000. The project continued with ongoing additions for the first several years, including upholstering the seats, installing a snap-on cover, a swim platform, cup holders, a wakeboard pylon, and a sound system. Continue reading

LUV N IT

Van Dam Custom Boats – Part Two

EW-42 LG cover

Cover Photo: Nokomis, the sister ship to LUV N IT. Photo by Michel Berryer.

By Bruce Niederer

In the previous issue of Epoxyworks, we looked at the start up process employed by the craftsmen at Van Dam Custom Boats as they built LUV N IT, affectionately referred to as the Limousine in Van Dam Custom Boats-Part One. We ended our “tour” of this build with the hull stained and pre-coated with WEST SYSTEM® 105 Resin/207 Special Clear Hardener, and the custom-built stainless steel cutwater being fitted for installation.

Let’s pick up the build with the cabin top being installed…
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Huron Jewel

A Tall Ship for Drummond Island

by Captain Hugh Covert

The current boat I have is in good shape, sails well and has been a lot fun for 17 years. It had grown in the planning stage from 18 to 20, 22 and finally to 36 feet long on deck. But, while it grew much longer and somewhat wider, it didn’t gain much in headroom. The need for a bigger boat with more room, fused with a desire to sail a tall ship with passengers, resulted in a plan for a new boat. I have been captain of several big sailing vessels around the U.S. and the Bahamas, and have built several boats, so the idea of building one to sail close to home seemed natural. Continue reading