Category Archives: Tools to Make or Modify

laminated denim knife handle

Readers’ Projects, Issue 30

Laminated Denim Knife Handle Material

Knife makers Cliff Fendley and Mike Carter decided to try their hand at making laminated denim knife handle material. After some research, they chose to use WEST SYSTEM 105 Epoxy Resin with 206 Slow Hardener to laminate pieces of denim fabric into blocks from which they could machine knife handles. Mike first made a 5″ x 7″ piece about 1/2″ thick with alternating front and back layers of blue jean denim. Cliff made a 1″ thick 5″ x 5″ Piece from faded blue jean and 1″ thick 5″ x 5″ piece from faded blue jean and a 1″ thick 1″ x 7″ piece from alternating layers of tan and black denim which he twisted before pressing.

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1—This strongback table is used to assemble airplane wings. It must not twist or sag. The table was originally 32' long, but has been shortened to 20'. Four rubber casters, one at each corner, support it. Built as a strongback, it spans 20' (previously 32') without sagging.

Staudacher’s Strongback Table

by Brian Knight—GBI Technical Advisor

Above: This strongback table is used to assemble airplane wings in John Staudacher’s shop. It must not twist or sag. 

Jon Staudacher, of Staudacher Hydroplanes and Aircraft, has been using a long, very flat, work table/strongback that is mounted on casters. The table was originally 32′ long, but because of space considerations, Jon has since shortened it to 20′ (Photo 1, at top). Four rubber casters support it, one at each corner (Photo 2, below). Continue reading

Pacific Class sailboats

Readers’ Projects, Issue 20

Restoration of Pacific Class sailboats

These 31-10 Pacific Class sailboats appeared in Epoxyworks in 18, Fall 2001. They were being rescued and restored by a dedicated group in San Diego, California. John Sutphen, who was involved in the project, sent the photo (below) of one of the restored Pacific Class boats under sail: the reward of hard work and dedication.

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Create a positioning fixture by laminating several layers of fabric over the part to be machined. Use mold release, tape or plastic wrap to protect the part. Glue the drill bushing in position with G/5 Five-Minute Adhesive.

Make Shop Tools Quickly with G/5

By Tom Pawlak — GBI Technical Advisor

Above: One example of how to make shop tools quickly with G/5: Create a positioning fixture by laminating several layers of fabric over the part to be machined. Use mold release, tape or plastic wrap to protect the part. Glue the drill bushing in position with G/5 Five-Minute Adhesive.

Gougeon Brothers’ G/5 Five Minute Adhesive can be used in an infinite number of ways to repair and build a great variety of projects. From filling stripped screw holes in drywall to repairing broken wooden furniture, its versatility is limited only by one’s imagination. I value G/5 in my workshop because its quick cure time lets me build quality jigs, fixtures, and molds that are available for use almost immediately. Continue reading

Sandpaper Tricks for Random Orbital Sanders

By Tom Pawlak — GBI Technical Advisor

I recently ran out of sandpaper for my 5″ diameter random orbital sander, and needed only a few more sanding disks to finish the project. While my sander is equipped for the hook-and-loop style sanding disks, I had only PSA (pressure sensitive adhesive) style sanding disks. These did not stick well to the pad on the sander, and within a minute or two they would fly off, leaving me frustrated. I finished my project by gluing the PSA disks to worn out hook-and-loop disks with contact cement. This actually worked quite well. Continue reading

Fiberglass Application Tools

By Joe Parker

When two or more fiberglass laminators meet, the discussion always turns to resin application and hand wet out tools. In some respects, this is much like a political or religious debate. I thought it might be helpful to describe some of these tools, and identify (as I see it) the best tools for laminating. Continue reading

Edge Gluing Fixtures

by Brian Knight—GBI Technical Advisor

Rectangular or square edge strips tend to get out of alignment between mold stations, especially where the bend is tight and the planks have to be forced into position. You can build intermediate mold stations in these areas to support the planks in more places. Continue reading

Simple Shop Tools to Make

by Jim Derck and Captain James R. Watson, GBI Technical Advisors

Making a hole-locating tool

When replacing planking, often you have to drill a new hole through the wood and “hit” the existing hole on the frame (so as not to riddle the frame with new holes). This tool will help you properly locate the new hole. You can either modify a set of barbecue tongs to make this tool, or fashion one from strips of aluminum. Drill a hole in the blades. Attach a pointed stud to the lower blade. Continue reading