Tag Archives: Six10

cemetery monument repairs

Cemetery Monument Repairs

by Ron Graham

I started working regularly at Pine Ridge Cemetery, an abandoned, historic cemetery in Bay City, Michigan in 2009. For several years, I concentrated on mowing and clearing out scrub growth (clusters of hawthorn with up to 1 ½” thorns). I reached a point where things looked better with the grass and trees. That’s when I began working on monuments that needed to be raised, straightened, or stood up.

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Clam Girl, an adult sized pram

The Joy of Six10

For Teak Gunwales on Prototype Clam Girl

by Hugh Horton

Meade Gougeon was excited in 2008. “I’m using Six10 for everything!” he said. He was working on his sailing canoe in Florida. In every phone conversation we had he seemed to find a new use for Six10, “… even for composite layups because of its ‘shear thinning’,” a phrase new to me.

In May of 2018, a perfect application came along for Six10—the teak gunwales capping the plywood endgrain on my prototype Clam Girl.

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Six10 Adhesive Finds a Home in “Boutique Style” Construction

By Emily Soyka

Epoxyworks 40

Cover photo: Installing some of the assembled FRP louvered panels on the rooftop residence.

Renew Urban Charleston, LLC in Charleston, South Carolina has been using WEST SYSTEM® Six-10 Epoxy Adhesive to glue hundreds of pultruded fiberglass channels and square tubes together to form decorative louvers. When installed on the building, the louver assemblies create an aesthetic detail that draws attention to the unique rooftop residence on King Street in Charleston. Continue reading

Six10 Thickened Epoxy Adhesive

How Six10 was Formulated

By Mike Barnard

Putting epoxy resin and hardener into a single cartridge was an idea we had years ago, but the technology was never around to do it. Once the technology became available (in the form of a u-TAH chambered cartridge with a mixing wand), we needed to develop a two-part epoxy to go in it.

We chose the characteristics we wanted for this new epoxy: long open time, fast through-cure, full cure overnight, and ability to cure at low temperatures. With these Continue reading

White Oak Redux

White Oak Redux

By Bruce Niederer and Bill Bertelsen

Building stuff, especially boats, with wood is much like a religious calling; once you hear the call, there’s no turning back. Those who’ve heard the call will not suffer fools willingly, so when I decided to conduct some white oak adhesion and shear testing and report the results in Epoxyworks 31, skeptics and believers alike took to the internet wooden boat forums-and had no problem speaking their minds! Having healed from the pummeling I took in some quarters, I’m back again to report the promised follow-up test results. Continue reading

A Magnesium Crankcase Repair

By Rob Van Mullekom

I work here at Gougeon Brothers, Inc. as Operation Supervisor in the epoxy department where we do production mixing, assembly, packaging and quality control of the epoxy products. A lot of the guys I work with here ride motorcycles. In talking with these guys, I found out that it is not uncommon to punch a hole in the ignition housing cover. In fact, that’s what happened to my bike. Continue reading

Sassafras 16 Family Build Weekend

by Grace Ombry

Epoxyworks 31

Cover Photo: Semi-finished Sassafras 16 canoes on display at the 2010 WoodenBoat Show at Mystic Seaport.

WEST SYSTEM®, Chesapeake Light Craft (CLC) and nine family groups joined forces at the 2010 WoodenBoat Show at Mystic Seaport in Connecticut this June to build nine Sassafras 16 kit canoes. With only a blue and white striped rental tent to shield them from the unseasonably hot weather in Mystic that weekend, everyone labored hard to get their boats a long way toward completion in just three short days. Continue reading

Make Your Own Soft Eye Pads

By Tom Pawlak

If you look closely at some of the photos in the Bufflehead article, you will notice small pad eyes in strategic locations inside and outside of Hugh Horton’s Bufflehead. Hugh makes these lightweight carbon or Twaron™ reinforced nylon line pad eyes for his sailing canoes.

He glues them onto the decks or inside his sailing canoes—wherever they’re needed to hold supplies in place or hold flotation inside the hull. The pad eyes are easy to make and are amazingly strong. Continue reading