STRINGS, a multihull sailboat designed by Jan Gougeon

Using a Quick Mold

By Greg Bull – Technical Advisor
Epoxyworks 49, Fall 2019

Cover photo: Strings, build by Gougeon Brothers, saling on the Saginaw Bay. Epoxyworks 49, Fall 2019

I used this quick mold method in order to move the mainsail traveler cleat from the transom of Strings to put it within easy reach of the helmsmen. The part I made had to be strong enough to withstand the loads of the traveler.

A male mold was the best choice for creating the shape to put the cleat where I wanted it. I
began with Owens Corning® Foamular® 150 foam insulation, the “Pink Panther” rigid board foam sold at home improvement stores. It comes in different thicknesses and will bond easily with WEST SYSTEM Epoxy to build thickness or create the desired shape. This foam is inexpensive and easily contoured with basic hand tools. I used a piece that was 2″ thick by 3″ wide and 7″ long. Continue reading

West System Epoxy

The Basics of WEST SYSTEM Epoxy

By Don Gutzmer

For those who want to work with epoxy resin and hardener, each February Gougeon Brothers provides a Fiberglass Boat Repair Class for repair professionals. Here are some of the basic techniques we teach in the class, as well as helpful tips for working with WEST SYSTEM Epoxy.

Epoxy’s Cure Stages

What is the difference between working time, pot life and cure time? All three are slightly different. Continue reading

Epoxy casting can be done in many colors and depths

Casting Epoxy

By Rachael Geerts

Casting epoxy is really catching on. Live edge tables with bright centers, clear coasters with stones, wood, or shells intricately placed, or even beautiful jewelry can be made with WEST SYSTEM Epoxy. With so many people venturing into using epoxy this way, I will address common questions about casting depth, colorants, bubble removal, and finishing. Continue reading

Marquetry Eat a Peach tribute guitar

The Eat a Peach Tribute Guitar

A Marquetry Love Letter to the Allman Brothers

By James Macdonald

The design features my marquetry rendition of some of the original artwork by Wonder Graphics on the inside cover of their epic Eat a Peach album, released in 1972.

In the early days of my woodworking career, beginning in 1981, I spent time as a boatbuilder at Wood Boats, a restoration yard in Norwalk, Connecticut. From the first day of my job there I learned the importance of epoxy in all aspects of boatbuilding. Inspired by reading Mother Earth News, I moved to rural Maine, built my own home, and got a job at another boatshop (this one in a huge, defunct chicken barn) in Lincolnville, Maine. I started my own woodworking shop in 1988. Continue reading

a roll of paper towels

Clean White Paper Towels

Q. What should I wipe the surface with before applying WEST SYSTEM Epoxy?

A. Use water and paper towels.

If using a solvent, like acetone, make sure to use clean, white, non-printed paper towels—not a rag. Using printed paper towels with acetone or other solvents can make the ink rub off, contaminating the newly sanded surface. Continue reading

varnish over epoxy

Clear Coating with 207 Special Clear Hardener

By Terry Monville – Technical Advisor

Not that long ago, clear coating with epoxy meant that you were finishing a natural wood canoe or kayak, or the teak toe rails on your boat. Today, WEST SYSTEM 105 Resin and 207 Special Clear Hardener is used for clear coating in many different ways. Regardless of the project, there are some basic techniques to follow when epoxy coating and a few pitfalls to avoid. Continue reading

The completed Jericho Skiff

Building a Jericho Bay Lobster Skiff

By Brian Donaldson

Over the past three winters, the boatbuilding crew of the Saginaw Bay Community Sailing Association (SBCSA) strip-built a Jericho Bay lobster skiff. They used the plans from WoodenBoat magazine, which master boatbuilder Tom Hill measured from a Joel White-designed boat. More than twenty people have worked on the skiff. Continue reading

A scrap of curved fiberglass panel was the perfect piece to extend the nose of the car body to match the new profile.

Building Composite Parts

Using a car body mold to modify a race car demonstrates this approach to building composite parts using different kinds of molds.

By Don Gutzmer – Technical Advisor

Featured image (above): A scrap of curved fiberglass panel was the perfect piece to extend the nose of the car body to match the new profile.

Creating things has been a passion of mine over the years, and I continue to improve my skills and grow more proficient at building composite parts. I also enjoy the challenge of helping others create one-off composite parts. I’m happy to share some of the materials and techniques I’ve used over the years to build composites with WEST SYSTEM Epoxy and provide an example of a recent project. Continue reading