Monthly Archives: March 2024

Tips for Clear-Finished Wood

By Don Gutzmer – GBI Technical Advisor

The beauty of naturally finished wood on a boat is appealing to many boat owners, but the maintenance of clear wood finishes is an ongoing task. One way to reduce this task is to stabilize the moisture content of the wood with epoxy. Residents in Michigan or Florida may need to varnish their clear-finished wood surfaces yearly. In this article, we share expert tips for applying epoxy and fiberglass to wood surfaces for a clear, bubble-free finish.

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Repairing Bow Damage on a Lightning Sailboat, by GBI Technical Advisor Terry Monville. Featured in Epoxyworks #58.

Repairing Bow Damage on a Lightning Sailboat

By Terry Monville – GBI Technical Advisor

Getting started on any project is half the battle. This could not be truer when it comes to an unexpected fiberglass repair. Every crashed boat is different; making every repair a bit different. Some repairs are straightforward, textbook repairs. The damage occurs on a flat area of the hull that is a solid fiberglass laminate. A little grinding, a little fiberglass and you’re done. What happens when the repair is not so simple though?

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Lightweight Camper Build for a Pickup Bed, by Paul Butler. Featured in Epoxyworks #58.

Lightweight Camper Build for a Pickup Bed

By Paul Butler

As a boat builder and designer, I often look at things and think to myself, “I can build that, only lighter and stronger.” That’s exactly what happened with my latest project. I needed a new camper that would fit in the bed of my Tacoma pickup truck, be lightweight and have low windage. I wasn’t happy with what I was finding commercially, so I decided to build it, and build it better.

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Replacing the Wet Core in Another Spade's Rudder, by GBI Technical Advisor Don Gutzmer. Featured in Epoxyworks #58.

Replacing the Wet Core in Another Spade’s Rudder

By Don Gutzmer – GBI Technical Advisor

What happens when the core of a water-damaged rudder can’t be saved? Completely replacing the core of a rudder may need to happen for a variety of reasons. There may be an inability to dry the core and still maintain the structural integrity, or the repair may need to be completed in less time than just letting it dry. The rudder from Another Spade, a C&C 32 sailboat, had a wet foam core that is beyond saving. Here are the steps I used to restore this rudder.

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Patching up Shenanigans with Fiberglass

By Ray McCarthy

A friend gave me his well-used 1980 Sunfish sailboat, Stinkin’ Tuna. He and his brother had learned how to turn the boat (tacking) by ricocheting off rocks on Long Island Sound. Over the years they had kept the wreckage floatable with the application of non-hydrodynamic fiberglass patches. Though they made the boat functional, they hindered the boat’s performance. Time to get to work.

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Planer Chip Diverter Built with G/flex

By Stephen Clark

Back in the ’70’s I bought a 10″ INCA jointer/planer. It came with a molded plastic chip diverter for use when set up as a planer. Back then, there were no thoughts on the designer’s part of attaching a dust collector to the diverter. The diverter simply spewed chips out the front, right onto the work piece being fed through for thicknessing.

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