Category Archives: Automotive

Lightweight Camper Build for a Pickup Bed, by Paul Butler. Featured in Epoxyworks #58.

Lightweight Camper Build for a Pickup Bed

By Paul Butler

As a boat builder and designer, I often look at things and think to myself, “I can build that, only lighter and stronger.” That’s exactly what happened with my latest project. I needed a new camper that would fit in the bed of my Tacoma pickup truck, be lightweight and have low windage. I wasn’t happy with what I was finding commercially, so I decided to build it, and build it better.

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RV Wall Replacement

 

By Matthew Logering

When we purchased our 2006 Winnebago® RV, we knew we would need to complete some repairs. We never imagined the back wall would need to be removed and rebuilt from the ground up. One of the edges of the back wall was compromised which allowed water to penetrate the wall and eventually saturate a majority of the plywood within. After determining that the damage was too great to spot treat/repair, we began the process of removing the wall.

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Kerry's black walnut truck bed

A New Bed for a Tired Truck

ABOVE: The completed truck bed in the remodeled 1953 Chevrolet 3100 pickup truck.

By Kerry Barnard

I purchased my 1953 Chevrolet 3100 pickup truck in 1975 from my best friend’s older brother. Years earlier, it had been the first vehicle I’d ever driven. For the next 29 years, it was stored outside and used sporadically. In 2004, I half-heartedly began restoring this truck and finally got serious about the project when I retired in 2018. Continue reading

The car camping screen, installed and ready to keep mosquitoes at bay.

DIY Window Screens for Car Camping

By Tom Pawlak — Retired GBI Technical Advisor

When I retired three years ago, I had plans to do a lot of camping. We have a small travel trailer that we love, yet there are times when camping alone that I prefer to keep things simple by leaving the trailer at home. Sleeping in the back of my small SUV works fine for me. There is even room to bring my canine pal along. Continue reading

carbon skinning a racecar dashboard

Carbon Skinning

By Jeff McAffer

It all started when I got a new 360-degree camera for my racecar. Mounted on the dash, it captures a really cool perspective that allows viewers to see forward, watch cars as I pass them, and to see what I’m doing (check it out at youtube.com/user/jeffmcaffer). Unfortunately, the dash produced considerable glare on the windshield. As you can see in the photo, it also had various holes and divots that were not useful in a racecar such as a coin tray, air conditioning vents, and extra switch panels. I wanted to fill those in. But how? Continue reading

A scrap of curved fiberglass panel was the perfect piece to extend the nose of the car body to match the new profile.

Building Composite Parts

Using a car body mold to modify a race car demonstrates this approach to building composite parts using different kinds of molds.

By Don Gutzmer – GBI Technical Advisor

Featured image (above): A scrap of curved fiberglass panel was the perfect piece to extend the nose of the car body to match the new profile.

Creating things has been a passion of mine over the years, and I continue to improve my skills and grow more proficient at building composite parts. I also enjoy the challenge of helping others create one-off composite parts. I’m happy to share some of the materials and techniques I’ve used over the years to build composites with WEST SYSTEM Epoxy and provide an example of a recent project. Continue reading

Packard woody wagon repaired with WEST SYSTEM Epoxy.

Readers’ Projects, Issue 49

Packard Wagon Restoration

Packard woody wagon panels

This is the Packard wagon I am redoing the wood on. Some of the original wood will be reused. I bleached all the wood before I varnished it so it will match. On the panels, I used 105 Resin and 207 Special Clear Hardener to epoxy the mahogany veneers to the steel door panels. I clamped them by vacuum bagging them. —Jeff Hobgood

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Daniel's grandson taking his new car and boat with trailer for a spin.

Chris Craft Baby Runabout

by Daniel Laeyendecker

I designed this project by scaling down a Chris Craft runabout from pictures I found online.

Hull and Drive Assembly

I started with five rib frames and a center beam temporarily mounted upside-down on a workbench. I glued and stapled the ¼” x ¾” bead-and-cove pine strips to the ribs. Once all the strips were installed, I removed the staples and sanded the hull smooth for the heat-activated 2″ mahogany strips I’d apply later.

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