Category Archives: Multihull Construction

vintage speed boat

Readers’ Projects, Issue 17

Vintage Speedboat

Paul Schreiter of Appleton, Wisconsin found the plans for this vintage speedboat in an old library book. The design is a 1936 inboard racer but powered by a 120 hp Mercruiser. Paul says, “I will go as fast as you want.” Continue reading

Nose for Speed

By Patrick Ropp

Some people just have a knack for things. We commonly say that someone may have an “eye” for beauty, an “ear” for music, or a “taste” for art, and now you can have a…“nose” for speed. Nose cones on outboard and sterndrive lower units are common in the world of boat racing. Whether it be outboard hydroplane racing, outboard performance craft (tunnel hulls), offshore powerboats, or customized recreational boats, all have factory built “speedo” lower units, which are very fast, but expensive. However, adding a nose cone to your existing lower unit is affordable, quick, and fun to do. Continue reading

The Re-commissioning of Adagio

by Meade A. Gougeon

Epoxyworks 8

Cover Photo: ADAGIO was racing with fast company in the 1996 Port Huron to Mackinac Race.

It was after eight months of building that we originally launched Adagio, our 35-foot cruising trimaran. It was on July 6, 1970, and she was then a unique boat in three respects.

First, she was the first large wooden boat entirely bonded together with epoxy using no permanent fastenings. While this is common today, it was revolutionary stuff back when adhesives for wooden boatbuilding (including epoxies) were looked upon as a backup to traditional wood fasteners like nails, screws and bolts. Continue reading

The Wingmast Advantage

By J.R. Watson

One of the original experimental components of Adagio was the rotating wing mast. In 1970, a plywood mast (a fore runner to our 050 mast design) was stepped on Adagio.

The rotated airfoil-shaped wing mast makes a smooth transition from mast to sail on the leeward side. This provides cleaner airflow around the mast. The benefit is better attached airflow, thus less drag and more power driving the boat. Continue reading

New Beach Cat (Part II)

Final Details

By Captain James R. Watson

(In Epoxyworks #5 I wrote New Beach Cat (Part I)—The Hull Story about constructing the hulls of my new beach cat.)

There is a little aftershock related to this event, with all the anticipation and abstracting of what she’ll finally be like—now we find out. One finds it is also time to evaluate whether or not this project fulfills the criteria that drove its initiation. Continue reading

New Beach Cat (Part I)

The Hull Story

By Captain James R. Watson

In issue Epoxyworks issue #4 I wrote about the construction of new hulls for my Hobie-14 catamaran and discussed details that made building it easier. Well, as with most building projects, it was not completed on time. I can blame only this summer’s excellent sailing conditions for the delay. Whenever I had time to work on the boat, I went sailing instead. Of course, my reliable Hobie-14 sitting on the beach was the source of my summer-long delay. Heck, I support the concept of “take your time and enjoy the building project rather than rush through it.” Continue reading

Stitch & Glue Details

by Captain James R. Watson

You may have read my articles about how to build mail boxes, canoe paddles, wheels, tillers, how to get glue off clothing and so on. Somebody called the other day and asked, “You ever build a boat?” Well, it so happens I’m building one right now and it’s a good example for describing the latest stitch and glue techniques. Continue reading

G-32

Gougeon 32 Update

Gougeon Manufacturing Corp. continued to fine tune the design and production of the Gougeon 32 sailboat in 1993, adding a sporty, wrap-around window look. Continue reading