Category Archives: Canoe & Kayak Construction

deer antler replica rack by Scott Oldanie

Readers’ Projects, Issue 32

Deer antler racks and more

Scott Oldanie has found many unique uses for WEST SYSTEM Epoxy around his Lemont, Illinois, home. These are just a few. He built two whitetail deer antler replica racks, bonded and carved; a wooden bear head attached to the end of a beam; and repaired damaged moose antlers and rotted log ends of his log home.

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Sassafras 16 Family Build Weekend

by Grace Ombry

Epoxyworks 31

Cover Photo: Semi-finished Sassafras 16 canoes on display at the 2010 WoodenBoat Show at Mystic Seaport.

WEST SYSTEM®, Chesapeake Light Craft (CLC) and nine family groups joined forces at the 2010 WoodenBoat Show at Mystic Seaport in Connecticut this June to build nine Sassafras 16 kit canoes. With only a blue and white striped rental tent to shield them from the unseasonably hot weather in Mystic that weekend, everyone labored hard to get their boats a long way toward completion in just three short days. Continue reading

Norwegian Gunning Dory

By Paul Butler

This plywood/epoxy Norwegian Gunning Dory is drawn with inspiration from the classic lines of Scandinavian watercraft. The ply/epoxy hull is much simplified from traditional plank-on-frame versions. The lightweight version can weigh less than 60 lb (27 kg), making it an easy car-topper. Instead of the traditional V bottom, there is a flat panel on the hull bottom to simplify construction and provide extra stability.

Safety Features

Watertight fore and aft compartments provide additional hull support, dry storage and the safety of flotation spaces. Additional compartments are optional and open-water versions can be built self-bailing.

Capacity and Functionality

Loaded with gear for camp-cruising or with a passenger and gear, the boat becomes increasingly stable for general recreation, fishing, or drifting small streams and exploring waterways. The 15′ 9″ (4.8 m) length and 45″ (1.14. m) beam provide a stable platform. The Norwegian Gunning Dory can also be poled, or paddled like a canoe. There is room for two fixed-seat rowing stations or a single sliding seat; the lightweight hull is fast enough to make open water rowing with a sliding seat interesting.

Easy Care

Maintenance is much reduced with epoxy sealed plywood and the slick, hard graphite covered bottom allows dragging the hull over parking lots, launch ramps and gravel beaches.

The 30-page building plans are $46 and include photos, sketches, step-by-step directions and a discussion of many options to help the amateur builder customize the boat to suit usage. See additional photos with 2 interior layouts and details at www.butlerprojects.com.

 

From Serendipity to Bufflehead

By Hugh Horton 

The cover of Epoxyworks 16 shows Serendipity, the sailing canoe I built for Meade Gougeon on a Bell “Starfire” hull after he had seen me sailing my Starfire-based Puffin in the summer of 1998. The Starfire hull was designed by Dave Yost.

Sitting at the lunch table in the Gougeon’s boat shop in 2001, Meade said he was thinking of building a few Serendipity sisters and asked me if I’d like one too. I said no because Continue reading

Make Your Own Soft Eye Pads

By Tom Pawlak

If you look closely at some of the photos in the Bufflehead article, you will notice small pad eyes in strategic locations inside and outside of Hugh Horton’s Bufflehead. Hugh makes these lightweight carbon or Twaron™ reinforced nylon line pad eyes for his sailing canoes.

He glues them onto the decks or inside his sailing canoes—wherever they’re needed to hold supplies in place or hold flotation inside the hull. The pad eyes are easy to make and are amazingly strong. Continue reading

Marquetry Made Easy

By Al Witham

There is a simple way for those of us who may be “artistically challenged” to produce inlaid furniture, jewelry boxes, canoe decks, trays, etc. with a modest investment in equipment and materials, in a reasonable period of time, and with eye-pleasing results. I have no formal training in making inlays, but have found a method which works for me. I showed this method to a friend who is a shop teacher; he now has students as young as ten incorporating it into their school projects with excellent results. My method is adaptable, user-friendly within limits and forgiving of minor cutting errors. Even novices can produce great looking marquetry. Continue reading

Small Craft Builders Rendezvous

By Tom Pawlak

In July 2008 I attended the Small Craft Builders’ Rendezvous in Peterborough, Ontario at the invitation of Ted Moores and Joan Barrett. Their company, Bear Mountain Boats, was one of the sponsors of the gathering which included modern wood and epoxy constructed boats as well as traditionally built wooden canoes. Those attending ranged from professional builders to serious amateurs. Continue reading

Why People Build Boats

By Ron Frenette

A rest break after crossing a big open stretch into a facing wind—day 2 of a 7-day trip. Closest is a 16’ Prospector, in the middle is Ron Frenette and his wife in their 17’ Nomad and on the outside is a traditional wood canvas canoe built in the 1950’s.

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Building a Pair of Chesapeake 16 Kayaks

by Chris Jacobson

Epoxyworks 27

Cover Photo: Paddling the south shore of Ontario’s Lake of Two Rivers and into Pog Lake.

It all began when we went camping in Algonquin Park in 2005. We rented a couple of plastic kayaks and the kids loved it. We came home with the intention of buying a    couple of kayaks but while on the internet we saw these stitch and glue make’m yourself boats. I purchased the books “The New Kayak Shop” and “Kayaks You Can   Build. ”Both are available at Chapters or Amazon.com. We decided this was something we could do. We also discovered www.clcboats.com which would prove to be a   tremendous source of encouragement during the project. We made a day trip to Toronto to purchase plans for a Continue reading

Gougeon 12.3 canoes

The Gougeon 12.3 Canoe

by Tom Pawlak

Epoxyworks 29

Cover Photo: A small sampling of the Gougeon 12.3 canoe family. Robert Monroe’s cold-molded canoe (foreground) came from a half-mold that eventually resulted in the a 12.3 mold (object directly behind first canoe) which has been used since 1989 to produce dozens of offspring that reflect a wide raged of tastes and technology.

The Gougeon 12.3 canoe represents several decades of experimentation by employees of Gougeon Brothers. Dozens have been built but no two are exactly alike. The evolution of the Gougeon 12.3 parallels our love of boating, passion for innovation and desire to build better boats—all of which contribute to the products we produce today.

It started 35 years ago with a personal project of Jim Gardiner, who was an employee of Gougeon Brothers at the time. He wanted to build the lightest solo canoe possible  Continue reading