Category Archives: Tools to Make or Modify

Specialty Tools for Fairing

By Tom Pawlak — GBI Technical Advisor

The Fairing File

My son Matt and I recently built a small stitch-and-glue boat. While fairing the bottom we discovered that hacksaw blades can be modified and used for fairing.

The buildup of fiberglass tape along the chine and keel had caused a low spot in the hull all along the edge of the fiberglass buildup. Filling the low spot with low-density filler was easy, but sanding the cured epoxy with sanding boards was slow work. Experimenting with a new hacksaw blade, we found it easily cut through the low-density filler and occasional high spots in the fiberglass. Continue reading

A Gadget for Easy Syringe Filling

by Brian Knight—GBI Technical Advisor

WEST SYSTEM® 807 Syringes are handy for injecting epoxy into hard-to-reach areas, but it’s difficult to load the syringe with thickened mixtures that won’t pour into the syringe body. With this gadget, loading non-sag mixtures is easy. It consists of a flat plastic disc with a short length of PVC pipe bonded over a hole cut in the center of the disc. Push the disc down in a container of thickened epoxy and epoxy is forced out through the hole in the disc, through the PVC tubing, and into the syringe. Continue reading

A Build-It-Yourself Drill Guide

by Brian Knight—GBI Technical Advisor

Bud Hauschild, from Hastings, Michigan, sent us this idea for a drill guide used to accurately drill holes through irregularly shaped surfaces. Additionally, you can use this guide to drill from both sides of a thick beam and have the holes line up. Orthopedic surgeons use a similar device to drill holes in bone for screws or pins. Continue reading

Flat Washer Scribe

by Brian Knight—GBI Technical Advisor

Most woodworkers, at one time or another, have to scribe a piece of wood to fit closely to an irregular surface. Here is an old boat builder’s method to scribe a line to a gently curved surface. The only equipment necessary is a collection of different size flat washers and a sharp pencil. Continue reading